Calorie restriction is the only 'scientifically proven' method to consistently extend health and lifespan.

"He who has a mind to eat a great deal, must eat but little; eating little makes life long, and, living long, he must eat much" - Luigi Cornaro

Skincare and Picture Update

So, I’m still alive. I’ve not abandoned the blog or anything, but I’ve had other things I’ve needed to do which is just taking priority over this blog at the moment. I’ll try to update more frequently though from now on. Anyways, here’s a little update to my skincare regimen!

I’ve used Skinceuticals CE + Ferulic since around 2009, and it worked great! But I felt I wanted a change and to try skinceuticals other serum called Skinceuticals Phloretin CF and I’ve been using it for about 1 year now in combination with the advanced pigment corrector by skinceuticals. Both of them contain vitamin C, which is great to boost collagen, but this serum is more targeted at clearing up hyperpigmentation and also inhibits the breakdown of elastin and increases elastin synthesis. I’m on my second bottle now, each one lasts approximately 6 months when I use them every morning, and so although it’s quite expensive, it does go a long way. 🙂

My diet has been excellent lately, I’ll go into that on my next post very soon. Although I haven’t been exercising nearly as much as I should be. My friend offered to sign me up to go to the gym nearby and I get a discount for the initial payment, but now that summer is almost here, I think I’ll leave it until summer is over… as I don’t mind exercising and going running in this weather anyway.

31 years and 7 months. BMI 19. Calorie intake at 1750 k/cal a day.

Is Mild Calorie Restriction Enough?

Even a Modest Reduction in Calorie Intake Might Extend Your Life

Calorie Restriction is known for extending lifespan in animals and does so in proportion to the degree of restriction. In a long running experiment by the NIA, rhesus monkeys were split into groups, where one group would eat ad lib and the other group would be put on 30% Calorie Restriction. The researchers set up the study so that the control fed animals were actually restricted by 10%, so they wouldn’t become fat or obese. The calorie restricted group would receive 30% less calories. Unfortunately, unlike the Wisconsin study which showed a significant increase in lifespan, this study showed no increase in mean lifespan in the adult-onset CR group. There could be many reasons for this, which I already discussed in my review of the studies here

It was already known that in certain strains of lab animals, 10% restriction can result in as much lifespan extension as 30% CR. Could the contradictory results of the two monkey studies be explained by the fact that the level of restriction in the NIA monkeys was already enough to elicit the maximum lifespan increase in rhesus monkeys? I’m not so sure that is the answer because the rhesus monkeys failed to exhibit important changes their health parameters that match rodents and people who do calorie restriction. However, in both groups the monkeys lived to around 35 years old, which is old for a rhesus monkey when you consider the fact that in previous cohorts, monkeys tend to live to an average of 27-28 years. That corresponds in human years to about 21 years extra life. They also noted that 4 calorie restricted monkeys lived to beyond 40 so far, and only 1 ad lib (10% CR). And out of 3264 rhesus monkeys looked at on record, only 2 monkeys had ever reached this age before. So that tells you something… maybe that ageing was indeed slowed. And we are still waiting for the final results from both studies which will be here in a few years time. And also, cancer incidence reported at the time was zero for the 30% CR group in the NIA study.

The researchers wrote about the monkey studies saying

“The possibility that lower levels of DR are as effective in increasing life span as high levels of DR could help explain the contradictory results reported on the effect of DR in rhesus monkeys in studies that were conducted at the University of Wisconsin and the NIA. One of the major differences in these two studies was body weight and the amount of food consumed by the AL monkeys. Body weight and food consumption were significantly greater in the AL monkeys in the study at Wisconsin compared to the AL monkeys at the NIA, suggesting that the AL monkeys at the NIA were slightly restricted compared to the AL monkeys at Wisconsin. Therefore, the lack of an increase in longevity reported by Mattison et al. could be because of the AL rhesus monkeys in this study having achieved a level of restriction necessary for an increase in life span, and a further restriction did not further increase lifespan.”

Study in Rats Comparing 10% CR and 40% CR

344 rat

In a study conducted in rats, the researchers looked to compare the difference in lifespan and disease in rats fed an ad-lib diet, 10% CR and 40% CR. What was interesting and what came to my attention before I had finished with the paper was that the mean lifespan was similar for both restricted groups, and that there was a significant increase in 10% survival and maximum lifespan for the 40% CR compared with the other two groups. This is similar to the trend that has been noted in the NIA rhesus monkey study. Because of genetic differences, monkeys may respond differently to varying levels of CR. You can see that quite a few rats in the study below died earlier than the 10% CR group, but the groups diverged near the end of the lifespan curve and the rats who ate 40% less lived far longer. Ad lib group max 1026 | 10% CR max 1180 | 40% CR max 1400.

So for a lucky few who do engage in more strict CR, the pay off might be significant. Although, on average, perhaps even a modest reduction in calories will increase your lifespan by quite a few years.  The rate of declining health for the ad lib and 10% CR group was similar, there was no real difference. However, only in the 40% restricted group was the slope of the gompertz curve altered, reflecting that the ageing of these animals was slower and they remained healthier and had a slower rate of decline in their health. The earlier deaths of some of the 40% CR group suggests that perhaps it was too much for some of the animals.

Calorie restriction in rats

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2015 Dec 22. doi: 10.1111/nyas.12982. Significant life extension by ten percent dietary restriction. Richardson, Austad, Ikeno, Unnikrishnan, McCarter RJ. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26695614

Humans who practice calorie restriction have greater control over the level of CR and can micro-manage their diet and supplements. We can also use tests to guide our practice and ease back when it might be too much. This gives us the best chance to see the best possible results from calorie restriction without compromising our health.

You can find the full paper here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nyas.12982/epdf

 

 

Looking Younger Than Your Age

Start a healthy diet early to see the biggest benefit

I’ve always believed that there is benefits to be gained from starting an ‘anti-ageing’ diet or ‘programme’ from an early age. I wouldn’t recommend calorie restriction before age 20, but eating healthily from a young age is important. It never made sense to me to start eating healthily and looking after yourself when the damage has already accumulated, and is visible on the outside. It’s often thought that the appearance reflects what is going on inside the body – so if someone looks quite healthy on the outside, there’s a good chance that the person is healthy on the inside as well. This of course may not always be true, but more often that not, it probably is a good indicator of health and perhaps even how long a person might have left.

In a recent study researchers took about 1000 people and looked at their biological age over a period of 12 years – starting from age 26 – and tracked changes in 18 biomarkers across chronological ages: 26 years, 32 years, and 38 years to determine the pace of ageing among the individuals. They looked at their metabolism, mental abilities, telomeres, and others biomarkers associated with organ function, and found that most people’s biological age matched closely with their chronological age, but a few aged more slowly (or not at all), while others aged much faster than normal.

As you can see, most people’s biological age closely matched their chronological age (38), but there were a few outliers.

biological age

Quantification of biological aging in young adults http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/07/01/1506264112

What’s more is that their internal health as measured by these tests reflected how old they looked on the outside. People who had younger biological health also appeared to look much younger than their age. And those who had worse results tended to look older than their chronological age. That in itself shouldn’t be much of a surprise, actually. But then again, seeing such dramatic differences even at a young age does show us that we need to take action early in life to have the biggest impact in staying young.

It’s assumed that we are optimized and functioning at peak performance in being able to deal with the day-to-day damage when we are young; and that good or bad lifestyle choices wouldn’t really affect the rate of ageing all that much, but this is wrong. Although the body can tolerate a lot at say, 25, it’s by no means immune from the damaging effects of bad lifestyle choices; whether it be junk food, smoking, too much alcohol, lack of sleep or whatever. The study also suggests that there might be room for improvement, and that we can make our cells and body more resistant to damage even in our 20s and see dramatic results if we maintain a good lifestyle.

As we get older, the risk of disease grows exponentially and we notice the effects of ageing come more rapidly, especially after the age of 60. It could be argued that the greatest impact from diet would only apply at middle age, but the study above refutes that idea. Anecdotally I can say that I know people who have looked after themselves when they were younger and are now benefiting from it. They look young and are generally much healthier than most people for their age. Starting a healthy lifestyle early in life means you get to enjoy more of your youthful period of life and also extend middle age period too.

Inspiration

I know of two people who are really impressive when it comes to looking younger: Masako Mizutani who is now around 47 years old and looks in her late 20s to 30; and also my friend Paul who is 46.5 years old but still genuinely looks around 25 years old. It’s incredible… and hard to believe! But they look amazing. And I know that it’s not all about how young a person looks, but it does help, because it reinforces and validates the healthy choices you’ve been making.

Do you know anyone who looks very young for their age? And do you think your diet has slowed down ageing for you?

People age at wildly different rates, study finds (CBS MORNING SHOW)

 

And since we’re talking about looking younger, here’s a few pictures of me today while I was messing around with the webcam (I’m going to be making videos for my Youtube channel). 🙂   You can see the videos that I’ll upload HERE

Sorry for the lack of smiles in these pictures haha xD I never really posed for a picture –  they are just captured from the video I was checking after recording lol :p

Also, my hair seems to have grown a little more. 😮 I think it looks a little dry here because I hadn’t long showered and used clarifying shampoo . 🙂

30 Years 9 months Old  

 

 

crvitality matthew lake

 

 

matthewFaceBook

 

If you want to know what foods can improve your skin and slow the apperance of ageing, read How To Look Younger

Setting Goals

Always Set New Goals 

Not too long ago I was thinking that I hadn’t really challenged myself much lately or set goals for myself. Calorie Restriction can be a challenge at first, but eventually it does become routine for most of us. Some of us would spend a lot of time learning about nutrition by reading books and science articles to understand more about nutrition, health, and longevity. Although there’s a lot of new information come out all of the time about nutrition and the benefits of certain foods on disease and health, we learn learn plenty to be able to sustain ourselves on a calorie restriction diet and practice it safely. From that point we are essentially on autopilot. Many of us move onto other interests, while also maintaining this lifestyle.

Learning New Languages

So, back to what I was going to say: It’s normal that once we get comfortable with things how they are, we stay there and don’t take steps to move out of it. When we are children we have so much curiosity and are always exploring new things. Some people stay curiosity in life, while others stick to what they know and rarely venture outside of that for whatever reason. In life it’s important that we don’t get into a routine that makes us become stagnant and stops us from growing as a person. We should always explore new things, keep learning new skills, take up new hobbies, and meet new people. Ultimately it is up to us to make life the best it can be.

 

languages

 

I was introduced to K-pop last year by a friend and instantly loved it. At first it’s a bit ‘sensory-overload’ – but after a while you get used to it. Then I started to watch popular Korean Dramas and loved those too! They were different than the one’s I’ve watched in the UK or from the US. In my opinion, the dramas I’ve watched so far, including “Shine or Go Crazy and “My Love From The Star” are very good. My love from the Stars was streamed 14.5 billion times.

I think the Korean dramas have a more authentic style, better connections between the characters, beautiful fashion and costumes, and they are just wonderful to watch. What they sometimes lack with special effects, they more than make up with very good plots. They are funny, cute, interesting, and can be addicting!

After a while of learning more about Korea I’ve started to learn more about the history of Korea and their culture. It’s all been a fascinating experience so far. It’s almost like a new world opening up. And I guess that’s one of the best part about learning a new language.

Now that I’ve fallen in love with South Korea, I’ve begun learning the language because I would love to be able to communicate with the people when I eventually visit the country. (I will also visit Japan on the same trip). So I’ve set myself a goal to become quite fluent by next April, which I think is more than enough time given how much time I spent actively studying. For now I’ll study at home and look for South Korean stores and places here where I live so I can practice the language, as well as using Skype to talk to Korean friends of course. I’ve been researching a few Korean places local to me, and luckily there’s a few! Most South Koreans that come to the UK reside in London, though.

My Plan

When I get a good handle on Korean I will then start to introduce another language. Right now I still have a good grasp on Spanish, so I will listen, read, and try to speak more so I can improve to where I can converse easily. When I was studying it before I never really spoke much, and speaking is much more difficult compared to just being able to understand what is being said.  But for now my most active language will be Korean. At some point over the next few months I will also start to learn Japanese, too. But I won’t stop there! I intend to learn many languages… So far the one’s that I plan to learn are as follows:

Korean

Japanese

Spanish

Chinese (Mandarin)

Why Learn All of These Languages? 

Firstly, why not? Once you’ve learned them you can enjoy all that these countries have to offer. By learning these languages I will be able to speak to people from these countries and create new opportunities. Here where I live we’ve also had so many university students from China in recent years, too! And language learning also helps you think differently. It improves your memory and keeps the brain young!

As I was trying to look for tips on learning new languages, I came across a guy who speaks 50 languages – not all fluently, but many of them he is exceptionally good at. He also has a love for Asian languages and culture. You can see him converse in them in the video below.

My experience in learning Korean has been great so far. I love every minute of it. It doesn’t even feel like I am studying because I enjoy it so much. And that’s the way language learning should be! 🙂 It feels amazing to just be able to understand suddenly a few verses in a song that you couldn’t a few weeks ago. Over time things that were just “noise” become clearer. It’s these little achievements that make me excited! But the real benefit for me would be able to speak to people in their native languages. This is my goal, and I will achieve it!

Okay, that’s all for now. There’s lots more to update you on with regards to new goals of mine, but I wanted to stay on the topic of language. 🙂

LANGUAGES IN THIS VIDEO:
-MANDARIN
-KOREAN
-TAGALOG
-VIETNAMESE
-BR. PORTUGUESE
-THAI
-TAIWANESE
-TWI
-FRENCH
-CAMBODIAN
-SPANISH
-RUSSIAN

Supplements on Calorie Restriction

What Supplements to take on CR 

I had this question the other day and it’s been a while since I updated on my supplement regimen, so before I do, I’ll talk a little about my feeling towards taking supplements while practicing calorie restriction and what supplements I take and recommend for people practicing calorie restriction or on a raw food, vegan diet.

Avoid the Hype with Supplements

When I first started to read about supplements I was very excited to learn about all the amazing benefits and how they were little miracles in a bottle. Back then in 2005 the research on Resveratrol was only just starting to ramp up. Scientists had discovered that it was Sirtuin Activator and speculated that it might let one get the benefits of calorie restriction without having to actually do the diet. All one had to do was take a supplement or a pill that would be developed and be more powerful.  So as it turns out, resveratrol only benefits obese mice placed on a very bad diet. In mice on normal diets, the resveratrol had no effect on longevity.

This story with regards to supplements is repeated over and over again. At first everyone is excited that we might be on to something that works and will cure people of all their health problems, and then a well-designed study looks at the supplement in question and there is no effect. And what’s scary is that some supplements actually reduced lifespan in long lived mice and calorie restricted animals.

So given that I am skeptical about supplements, you would think that I skip them and not bother. Well, there are supplements that I think do have fairly good evidence, and also won’t do any harm in the long term. I mean, the last thing I want is to take something and then it blocks the life-extending effect of calorie restriction. So anyway, below is a list of the supplements that I feel are needed, safe, and most likely beneficial.

Calorie Restriction Supplements

Vitamin B12: If you are vegetarian or vegan I think that it is a very smart idea to take vitamin B12. It is water-soluble and you can take so much of this that you don’t really need to worry about getting into toxicity issues. As you know, I am a strict vegetarian and “mostly” vegan, so I take a Methylcobalamin (B12) supplement.

Magneisum Citrate: When I started calorie restriction I ran into problems with magnesium. Despite me getting plenty in my diet, I had magnesium deficiency symptoms that went on for almost a year before I figured out the cause. Within a very short period of supplements, the symptoms went away and have not returned in 8 years. Magnesium is also just calming and makes you feel relaxed.

Vitamin D3: I tend to do a lot of work indoors and go through periods where I am a night owl, and don’t get much sun, so taking a vitamin D3 supplement is important for me. I find that it helps improve my mood so much. Also, many people here in the UK don’t get enough even when they are outside often. Vitamin D3 is important for bones, immune system, and well-being. A few studies have also shown it to be very effective in preventing cancer and the recurrence of various cancers. I take at least 2000 IU a day.

Zinc: On a plant-based diet I get a lot of copper and not enough zinc. Since copper and zinc compete for the same pathway, it is crucial to get the correct ratio. It’s recommended that we have zinc-copper ratio of 8:1 to 10:1 — so at least 8 mg of zinc for every 1 mg of copper in your diet. I use CRON-O-METER to find out how much I am getting of each.

Allicin Max: The only stabilized allicin supplement out there and is one of my favourite supplements ever. I cannot tell you how many times I feel it has saved my from falling ill with colds. I take it every day now to protect myself, and I truly believe that it has helped me so much.

I had a bacterial infection years ago and nothing would work, no matter how many antibiotics I was given. I decided to try this supplement after a friend recommended it to me. Before I took it I decided to do some research and found that it acted synergistically with antibiotics to clear infections, by lowering the minimum inhibitory concentrate (MIC) and reversing resistance. In studies it worked on its own as a quorum sensing inhibitor and thus the bacteria cannot communicate well or create a strong biofilm, leaving them vulnerable to the immune system and antibiotics. I’ve had multiple bladder infections growing up and had to resort to antibiotics (they say once you get one, 50% of people have a recurrence), but eventually they became less effective. Trimethoprim stopped working, so I tried Doxycycline (sometimes long term low-dose) and it was great at first, but it was slowly losing its potency. E coli was the problem (causes 90% of UTI’s); and it was becoming resistant.

I was already taking other supplements like AHCC and/or Beta glucans to help with the immune system while taking those antibiotics. And I believe they did help clear it up fast, but for some reason it kept coming back. Ever since I added the Allicin to the mix, it wiped it out and has not returned in years! I’m sure Allicin helped me get rid of the problem for good.

Check out what others are saying about it also… It is available in creams and supplement form. (make sure you get Allicin Max if you’re in the UK and make sure the product contains allisure) It was also featured in the news a few years ago

Probiotics: I’ve taken probiotics for years because of my history with antibiotics. Although I’ve never felt any negative side effects on my digestive system from taking antibiotics in the past, I’m sure things were out of balance. I take at least one 30 billion CFU probiotic supplement every day. Before I was vegan I would get much of my good bacteria from probiotics yogurts.

My Thoughts on Anti Ageing Supplements

Be careful. There’s a lot of misinformation out there that you want to avoid. Calorie restriction is still the most effective method to extend lifespan. You don’t need to take a huge stack of supplements. If we are to find something that mimics the effect of calorie restriction in extending lifespan, it is likely to come out of the science lab. The closest and most encouraging news lately is about something called Rapamycin. It is a TOR inhibitor and used to help people who have organ transplants. In animal experiments they’ve found that it extends lifespan, even when given late in life. And synthetic versions of this are being developed and tried in older people. There is  also a study in dogs to see if it extends  lifespan. Keep an eye out for news on Rapamycin!

References
1. Dietary supplementation with Lovaza and krill oil shortens the life span of long-lived F1 mice
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082564/

2. Influence on Longevity of Blueberry, Cinnamon, Green and Black Tea, Pomegranate, Sesame, Curcumin, Morin, Pycnogenol, Quercetin, and Taxifolin Fed Iso-Calorically to Long-Lived, F1 Hybrid Mice http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23432089

3. Lifespan effects of simple and complex nutraceutical combinations fed isocalorically to mice.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24370781

Calorie Restriction with Optimal Nutrition

Calorie Restriction Diet

What I Eat: Day 1

CRON stands for Calorie Restriction with Optimal Nutrition. Meaning that we have to get a lot of nutrition in less calories than we’d normally eat on an unrestricted or ad lib diet. So every day I am to eat high quality foods that will provide me with everything I need, and then if I still haven’t reached my calorie intake, I will eat whatever I want. This normally means something like dark chocolate or other healthy treat.

I’ve had a few people ask me over the last week about what I eat on my diet. So, my diet doesn’t change too much, as I’ve mentioned before. But I do tend to rotate my foods. When I first started calorie restriction I would eat the exact same meals every day and enjoy them. I never got bored of eating the same thing every single day. My family thought I was crazy and missing out, but I never felt like I was.  I really got a lot of variety packed into just 1550 k/cal. Now I have increased my caloric intake to between 1700 – 1800 k/cal per day.

What I Eat in a Day – Day one

Woke up and got a drink of my 2nd favourite drink – Pukka Lemon, Ginger & Manuka Honey Tea. It also has licorice root, elderflower, fennel seed, lemon verbena leaf, turmeric root, lemon essential oil flavour.

Lemon Ginger and Manuka Honey

For Breakfast I had a Green Smoothie! (it looks brown because of the blueberries). Ingredients were: 200 ml water, 2 Ripe Bananas, One Apple, 180 g Blueberries, 122 g Spinach, Teaspoon of Organic Golden Linseeds (flaxseed).

SMOOTHIE FRUIT

SMOOTHIE SPINACH

Green Smoothie

For Lunch I had: Spinach, one Sweet Potato, one Avocado, six Cherry Tomatoes (cooked to soften).  I put a bit of ketchup on there and a teaspoon of olive oil. Then I had a cup of green tea with ginger. 🙂

Sweet potaot with Avocado

A little later I had some strawberries! 🙂

Strawbarries

For Dinner I had my usual mixed vegetables: Peas, Carrots, Corn, and Green beans with olive oil, wholemeal bread and a few raisins. (I forgot to take a picture, but you get the idea! 🙂 )

Below is the nutritional breakdown of my diet on CRON-O-METER – Google it and use it to track your diet! It’s very useful!

So, the things that I was low were Selenium, Calcium and Zinc. I supplement Zinc and usually get plenty of Selenium normally. It was a pretty good and satisfying day! 🙂

 

Calorie Restriction Day 1 meal plan

Nutritional breakdown

Oh and I mustn’t forget the many cups of green tea! I have at least 5 cups of green tea every day with two tea bags per cup.

See my earlier posts on what I ate earlier in my CR Diet.

CRON-O-METER is also now available as an app. Get it HERE 

 


 Calorie Restriction Diet

What I Eat: Day 2

As I promised, I here’s a log of what I eat on Sunday. Although this day wasn’t a particularly good CR day because I didn’t have much of an appetite most of the day and kept it simple. I ate a lot of fruit because a) it was easier to digest and b) I have so much fruit, I really don’t want it all to go to waste.

So I  woke up early, but was still quite tired after staying awake longer than I expected. I had to help a friend catch her flight back to LA and arrange transport for her to get to the airport in London by noon on Monday. Lucky for her she made it!

For my breakfast I had a bowl of fruit: 1 Banana, 1 Apple, Blueberries, and Raisins. And a cup of Green Tea with Ginger. I was thinking about adding in a mango too, but I didn’t want my blood sugar spiking through the roof first thing in the morning! If I was going for a run in the cold on this morning, then maybe I would have considered it. The mango is getting a bit too overripe as well, so I better eat it soon!

Calorie Restriction Breakfast

A few hours later I saw a lovely ripe avocado in the fridge! Not sure I am going to finish them all off in time before they start going bad. They are already quite ripe and i have too many to eat. Although, I suppose I could eat a couple a day for a few days.

Wholemeal bread and one medium sized avocado with ketchup. Simplicity! Healthy Fast food! 🙂

Avocado on bread

Afternoon Smoothie! 🙂 Spinach, Mango, Apple, Banana. This was really nice! 🙂 I love Mangoes! It’s my favourite fruit…

SAM_2156

My final meal of the day was quite a filling one. I had whole wheat pasta and Bolognese.

Ingredients: Dolmio Bolognese Original Sauce, white button mushrooms, green peppers, red peppers, 2 cloves of garlic, pinch of cumin, a few flakes of mixed chillies. and cinnamon.

dinner cooking

Dinner

This wasn’t really a typical day for me. I’m trying to use up much of the food that I have in the fridge before they go bad. I hope that I’ve shown so far that calorie restriction meals don’t have to be tiny, like a carrot stick or a celery stick. You can still enjoy nice meals and that really satisfy you. The last meal of the day was so delicious. I normally have this maybe once a week or once every two weeks.

Tomorrow I’ll share with you what I ate today (Monday). 🙂 Sorry for the posts being a day late, I have to work around things and find time to write these posts.

How to Grow Long Hair Fast Naturally

Growing Long Hair Fast Naturally

You want grow long hair fast? Or at the very least, you want strong healthy hair? Growing long hair fast can take a bit of effort, but it’s not impossible to speed things up a bit.  I’m going to go through some tips on how to grow long hair fast naturally. Below I will include a list of foods that you should consider including in your diet to help you on your way!

When growing long hair we first have to make sure that you are healthy and not deficient in any nutrients. When you are properly nourished your body is in a happy state and it can allocate resources for the growth of hair on your head. By not getting enough nutrients, the last thing your body wants to do is support the growth something that is not vital to staying alive.  So when practicing calorie restriction we must maintain good nutrition if we want to keep our hair! Pretty simple!

Growing really long hair can take years for some people. For me it took me only two years to see my hair grow from my neck to my waist! Hair typically grows about half an inch per month, but this can vary from person to person. The length a person can attain is genetically determined. If your hair tends to stop at a certain length and never goes further, this is your terminal length and at the moment there’s really not a lot you can do.

 MY HAIR GROWTH 

June 2013

hair june 2013

Grow Long Hair Fast with these Foods!

1. Leafy Greens – Spinach and Kale are packed with nutrition. In fact, Kale is one of the most nutritious greens you can eat! Throw some Spinach or Kale into the blender and make a green smoothie to get the most out of them. Blending can increase the availability of nutrients for your body to absorb, especially beta carotene. They also are high in iron which is very important for hair growth.

2. Nuts – A great snack and  great for your hair too! Eating a handful of walnuts each day will increase oil production in your scalp and help keep your hair strong and less prone to split ends and breakage. My second suggestion is to eat one Brazil nut each day for Selenium. It’s important not to get too little or too much of this important mineral. And finally, eat a few almonds for some biotin.

3Beans and Lentils – Your hair is made up of protein! So of course these foods are perfect to include in your diet. Beans contain significant amounts of zinc which can often be lacking in a vegetarian or vegan diet. You might want to add some garlic as well. Garlic significantly increases the absorption of Zinc.

4. Sweet potatoes – These orange potatoes are loaded with vitamin A in the form of beta carotene. This pro-vitamin increases oil product and fights against dandruff. Dry scalp and dry hair is not good. Eat up! And don’t forget to add some extra virgin olive oil when eating them to increase absorption of beta carotene.

5. Oats – Eat your oatmeal. Silica is an overlooked mineral when it comes to health. It’s important for both skin and hair. Oatmeal contains up to 500 mg of Silica and will surely help you grow beautiful long hair in no time!

Grow Long Hair Fast with these Drinks!

1. Green Tea – High in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory. Sometimes when we’re stressed out we can increase the level of inflammation i the body as well as stress hormones and this is not good for hair growth. Green tea also contains l-theanine which is an amino acid that is calming and lowers cortisol. Add some fresh grounded ginger for a more powerful drink.

2. Hot Chocolate – Find a chocolate drink with at least 60% Cocoa. Chocolate increases circulation in the body and increases blood flow to the scalp. Also is high in magnesium, zinc, copper and iron which are important for hair. And who doesn’t love chocolate? really? … 🙂

 December 2013

1476143_10152395586263154_563316946_n

Growing Long Hair Takes Time

Yes, we can grow long hair naturally. Some grow it fast and some grow it slow. The most important thing is that your hair is maintained in a healthy condition so that it looks vibrant and shines! So try not to think about getting to your target length, but making sure that what you do have currently is healthy. The last thing you want to do is grow hair that is unhealthy and find you have to cut half of it because of split-ends.

Growing long hair fast is not just about diet, but it’s also how you treat your hair. In my other post I give tips on how to manage your hair and not destroy it before it gets to where you want it. 🙂

Growing long hair requires a lot of patience. Your hair can only grow so much every month, so just enjoy the process of styling it and going through different looks as it gets longer.

Boosting hair growth can also sometimes by achieved by taking a supplement called Biotin. A lot of people swear by it and say that it really helped speed the growth of their hair.

To see how long my hair got by the summer of 2014, see my other post:

How to grow long hair on a vegan diet