CR Blood Test Results (2016)

Blood Test Results – A few surprises!

It’s been quite a while since I had any blood work done, so I went to the doctors recently and sorted that out! I’ll be getting more blood work done as well as genetic testing (privately) in the near future. I want to start testing more frequently again now, rather than leaving it years without keeping track of my health.

I think it’s vital to get blood tests done if you’re into life extension and trying to get the most optimal results for longevity. Also, as you’ll see below, you can potentially run into trouble if you’re not watching things closely. Fortunately nothing too concerning showed up, but some results do suggest I need to make some changes.

Vitamin D – 25(OH)D Levelslaboratory-313870_960_720

I got a phone call from the doctor last week and he told me my 25(OH)D levels were really high! I’m sure he said they were at 504 nmol/L (200 ng/dl) which is on the verge of toxicity.

I repeated it back to him a few times just to be clear, and he said this was the result. Maybe he glanced over my result or maybe I misheard him, but the paperwork in front of me says 304 nmol/L (121 ng/dl). Still quite high, and  I’m going to stop my vitamin D supplements to bring it down a bit.

The vitamin D results are actually surprising given that I don’t really get a lot of sun, and I only took around 50,000 IU a week for about 3 weeks starting from over 2 months ago. and then I lowered it to about 5000 a day; but sometimes 10,000 a day. During the second month I lowered it to around 1000 IU per day, but I was taking it inconsistently.

It seems that I really don’t need much vitamin D3 to get my levels high. It shows the importance of actually getting blood work done… rather than supplementing blindly.

B12, Folate, Ferritin

Vitamin B12 – This came back lower than I expected, since in the last few months I was taking a B12 supplement from Now Foods. I don’t consistently take it, but I would have expected the dose to give me a higher level. I’ll change supplement and use a sublingual methylcobalamin supplement. The result was 336 ng/L (range 200-900)

Ferritin – My result wasn’t too unexpected because I am pretty much vegan (or chegan); but not sure I am comfortable with it being at 30 ug/L (range 15-300).

Having low levels of iron may decrease disease risk, lower oxidative stress, but 30 is probably too low and I’ll be looking to increase it to about 50.

Folate –  This result was normal at 10 ug/L (normal >3.0)

Full Blood Count

Everything seems fine here apart from a fairly high Neutrophil count, but still well within normal range (Neutophil = 4.9). This caused my white blood count to be higher than usual at 7.3.

I wasn’t aware of the impact eating a meal could have on white blood count; it wasn’t a fasting test so I ate my usual meal. The Neutrophil number can rise significantly in a short period of time from an infection, stress, lack of sleep.  And Lymphocyte count can be increase by a light meal before a blood test. I’m not sure why it was so high, perhaps even subclinical infection I wasn’t really ware of, I have no idea.

The number that I am more interested in is Lymphocyte, which came back at 1.8, which is lower than a few of my previous tests and is more indicative of a CR response.

Red blood cells were all within normal ranges; no signs of anaemia.

Testosterone 

Testosterone levels dropped from 17.9 nmol/L (512 ng/dl) to 14.3 nmol/L (412 ng/dl). It’s a significant decrease for just 3 years, but I’m fine with this result. This is also normal with CR.

HbA1c level

This test is to look at blood glucose levels over time (3-4 months). My result was 29 mmol/mol (normal <48). DCCT% would be 4.8%. Life extension foundation believes an optimal HbA1C level for longevity and slow aging is under 5%.

Thyroid

TSH normal 1.67 mU/L (0.30-4.40) and my fT4 levels has dropped from 18 to 13.9. I’ve noticed that I can eat less now and my metabolism seems slower, I guess it really has slowed down.  Lower level of T4 is apparently associated with extended longevity in animals and humans.

My thoughts

Some of the results I expected, but I think I’m going to have to start being a bit more careful again and more strict when it comes to my diet. It’s not that I’ve been slacking off, but my food choices haven’t been as good as they could be in the last 6 months or so. I’ve also been working from home, so not much exercise either.

I’ll do my next test, which will include all my usual blood tests and a repeat of these in about 6 months time. I’ll also be doing a genetic test using 23andMe before Christmas and I’ll share those results with you as well.

You can find my previous and current test results here

 

Benefits of Intermittent Fasting With Valter Longo, Ph.D

Interview With Valter Longo About The Benefits Of Fasting 

Fasting has been promoted for various reasons for centuries, but it’s only recently that researchers have been able to investigate the health benefits from doing strict fasting for days at a time.

Fasting is thought to induce various changes in the body that help protect the cells from damage that may occur from the environment, and trigger pathways in the body which may increase health and possibly lifespan.

My own experience with fasting

Fasting is something that I’ve done over the years in many forms. I’ve restricted my eating to only a few hours of the day and had long periods where I didn’t eat for up to 16 hours. I’ve fasted for one day of the week for 24 hours for many years. I’ve found that fasting seems to me mentally, to help me focus better.

It was always difficult to objectively tell whether or not fasting was helpful to myself, because I’ve done calorie restriction for such a long time, and this by itself has very good results in terms of improving health markers and improving health.

Fasting has always been pretty easy to to do for me, but I’ve found calorie restriction to be just easier. Not only that, calorie restriction has a lot more data to back up the health and longevity benefits.

There is no doubt that fasting is beneficial to health, but it’s still up for question whether or not it can really extend lifespan significantly without any reduction in calories. That being said, people who fast, may automatically have their caloric intake reduced anyway.

The Interview

Dr. Rhonda Patrick speaks to Valter Longo, who was a student of the calorie restriction researcher and pioneer Roy Walford. During the last few years, he has demonstrated that prolonged fasting is able to rejuvenates the immune system so that it is in a more youthful state, as well as induces anti-cancer effects, and helps prevent side effects from cancer therapies in humans. He also mentions how fasting may improve the health or even cure people with autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. I’ve previously shared one recent study showing how fasting rejuvenates the immune system.

Related articles 

Is fasting good for you?

Calorie Restriction, Probiotics, and Gut Health

Gut Bacteria Is An Important Factor In Maintaining A Healthy Body And Mind

Calorie restriction has beneficial affects on basically every system in the body, and gut health is no exception here. Gut bacteria is made up of different types of bacteria, good and bad, and these play a significant role in the host. In fact, we have about 10 times more bacteria that we have human cells! If we could weigh all the bacteria we have, it would come to about 3-4 lbs!

Gut bacteria can change depending on many different factors, such as weight gain or loss, stress, and antibiotics, illness, and having a bad diet. Maintaining good gut health will provide us with many benefits, but can easily be wiped out by overuse of antibiotics. Gut bacteria can recover, within a few weeks of ceasing antibiotic usage, but if you use them often, then this can give bad bacteria a chance to grow and take hold.

Many of the foods people consume today which is loaded with sugar, processed and devoid of any nutrition, does nothing good for the gut. Is it no wonder there are now many kids suffering with IBS and other conditions related to the digestive system?

Calorie Restriction and a healthy diet improved my gut health

When I was younger my diet was really bad and I would put sugar on just about everything. Like many other kids, I had also been on antibiotics a few times during my childhood. Sometimes I really needed them, but other times, probably not. We now know the consequences of using antibiotics too much. Bacteria build up resistance over time and can cause disease, sometimes requiring even stronger antibiotics.

By the time I reached I reached high school, around 11, I had symptoms of IBS and got diagnosed by the doctor as having this condition. As far as I can remember, there was no real advice from the doctor, but suggested that anxiety might be making it worse. While this is true, anxiety can make things worse, it was not the cause of the IBS — it was my diet! 

I began strict calorie restriction in 2005, but began eating healthier in 2003. It wasn’t until I had completely overhauled my diet did I notice a significant difference in my gut health. For the first few months, interesting things happened, I won’t go into detail! Mostly that foods didn’t seem to digest or breakdown well. This didn’t seem normal to me and worried me, but many months after I began calorie restriction, my gut health was better than ever.

After some time All the IBS symptoms had disappeared. So why was the doctor not able to link my diet to my IBS problems? For one, he never even asked me or my mother about my diet at the time.  I had suffered from this condition all through high school and in college, but I didn’t have to if I had been told the important connection between diet and gut health.

I believe the main reasons why my symptoms disappeared was because I had cut out all processed sugar from my diet. I cut out sweets, and other junk food. I included lots of fruits, and vegetables in my diet, and also a bit of meat like chicken and fish.

I’ve since became ‘mostly’ vegan, but in inclusion of meat in my diet didn’t stop me from curing this condition. Calorie restriction has been found to improve gut bacteria in mice and dogs, whilst studies looking at obesity in humans have shown a negative effect on gut health.

Gut bacteria plays a huge role in our health

  • Supplying essential nutrients
  • Aiding digestion and gut health
  • Keeping the immune system healthy
  • Mental health
  • Skin Health
  • Longevity

When I had to take antibiotics

I’ve mentioned before that I have been prone to UTI infections when I was younger, and that once a person gets one, it is 50/50 whether or not you will get another one. I don’t suffer from them anymore, but I did have to take low dose antibiotics for years because of repeated bladder infections, most likely from prostatitis. At times, especially on high doses of doxycycline, during an active infection, I felt increased anxiety, which seemed to be alleviated by taking probiotics.

I also had suffered from overgrowth of candida from taking these antibiotics, but this eventually regressed by itself once I had ceased taking the antibiotics. Before I had combined the probiotics with my antibiotic, I noticed my skin would break out after finishing a course. These side effects though were prevented once I introduced probiotics into my supplement regimen.

What are the best probiotics supplements?

Healthy Origins Probiotic 30 Billion CFU was one that I found to work best for me and so of course I highly recommend it. It contains 8 different strains which are resistant to stomach acid, so you can just add to some food, or take them however you wish, which is great for those who can’t swallow tablets. I recommend to store them in the fridge, but you don’t have to. One important factor when choosing a probiotic is either that it has a coating on there to prevent stomach acid from killing the friendly bacteria, or that the bacteria are resistant to the pH of your stomach acid. The probiotic below meets that criteria.

healthy origins probiotic

Blend of 8 Probiotic Strains 30 Billion Colony-forming units

Lactobacillus acidophilus (La-14) 12 Billion
Bifidobacterium lactis (BI-04) 12 Billion
Bifidobacterium longum (Bl-05) 1 Billion
Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Lr-32) 1 Billion
Bifidobacterium breve (Bb-03) 1 Billion
Lactobacillus casei (Lc-11) 1 Billion
Lactobacillus salivarius (Ls-33) 1 Billion
Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp-115) 1 Billion

See Reviews for Healthy Origins, Probiotic supplement

 

Symptoms of an unhealthy gut

  • Frequent infections
  • Poor skin
  • Fungus / candida infections
  • Acid Reflux
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Autoimmune issues and allergies

Should you take a probiotic?

If you’ve have used antibiotics in the past, especially recently, then it is worth doing 1-3 months of probiotics to see if you benefit from taking one. I’ve talked about, and I’ve used Healthy Origins Probiotic many times before, and keep going back to it because it’s one of the better quality probiotics out there.

To help make the probiotics more effective, make sure to include plenty of foods which are prebiotic such as garlic, leeks, onions, almonds. Foods include things like kimchi, kefir, and yogurts are also great sources of good bacteria.

I don’t take this probiotic all year, but usually during the winter months or when going through some kind of stress, to help boost my immune system.

In this BBC Article it was reported that ‘Older people have 1000 times less friendly bacteria in their gut’ – and researchers have since found that probiotics improves immune function in elderly persons.

What is the best probiotic for seniors?

There are many probiotics out on the market, but in some products, the friendly bacteria inlcuded do not make it destination where they can be beneficial to you the host. Friendly bacteria need to be resistant to stomach acid, and therefore only certain strains will work. The probiotic above from Healthy Origins is also suitable for elderly persons. Probiotics in seniors have been found to be safe, and increases resistance to gastrointestinal diseases associated with antibiotic usage, and also helps with symptoms like constipation in the elderly [4].

 

References

1. Structural modulation of gut microbiota in life-long calorie-restricted mice
http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms3163

2. Dogs Lived 1.8 Years Longer On Low Calorie Diet: Gut Flora May Explain It
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070419160140.htm

3 Changes seen in gut bacteria content and distribution with obesity: causation or association?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26474235

4. Review on microbiota and effectiveness of probiotics use in older persons

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4317609/

Skincare and Picture Update

So, I’m still alive. I’ve not abandoned the blog or anything, but I’ve had other things I’ve needed to do which is just taking priority over this blog at the moment. I’ll try to update more frequently though from now on. Anyways, here’s a little update to my skincare regimen!

I’ve used Skinceuticals CE + Ferulic since around 2009, and it worked great! But I felt I wanted a change and to try skinceuticals other serum called Skinceuticals Phloretin CF and I’ve been using it for about 1 year now in combination with the advanced pigment corrector by skinceuticals. Both of them contain vitamin C, which is great to boost collagen, but this serum is more targeted at clearing up hyperpigmentation and also inhibits the breakdown of elastin and increases elastin synthesis. I’m on my second bottle now, each one lasts approximately 6 months when I use them every morning, and so although it’s quite expensive, it does go a long way. 🙂

My diet has been excellent lately, I’ll go into that on my next post very soon. Although I haven’t been exercising nearly as much as I should be. My friend offered to sign me up to go to the gym nearby and I get a discount for the initial payment, but now that summer is almost here, I think I’ll leave it until summer is over… as I don’t mind exercising and going running in this weather anyway.

31 years and 7 months. BMI 19. Calorie intake at 1750 k/cal a day.

Is Mild Calorie Restriction Enough?

Even a Modest Reduction in Calorie Intake Might Extend Your Life

Calorie Restriction is known for extending lifespan in animals and does so in proportion to the degree of restriction. In a long running experiment by the NIA, rhesus monkeys were split into groups, where one group would eat ad lib and the other group would be put on 30% Calorie Restriction. The researchers set up the study so that the control fed animals were actually restricted by 10%, so they wouldn’t become fat or obese. The calorie restricted group would receive 30% less calories. Unfortunately, unlike the Wisconsin study which showed a significant increase in lifespan, this study showed no increase in mean lifespan in the adult-onset CR group. There could be many reasons for this, which I already discussed in my review of the studies here

It was already known that in certain strains of lab animals, 10% restriction can result in as much lifespan extension as 30% CR. Could the contradictory results of the two monkey studies be explained by the fact that the level of restriction in the NIA monkeys was already enough to elicit the maximum lifespan increase in rhesus monkeys? I’m not so sure that is the answer because the rhesus monkeys failed to exhibit important changes their health parameters that match rodents and people who do calorie restriction. However, in both groups the monkeys lived to around 35 years old, which is old for a rhesus monkey when you consider the fact that in previous cohorts, monkeys tend to live to an average of 27-28 years. That corresponds in human years to about 21 years extra life. They also noted that 4 calorie restricted monkeys lived to beyond 40 so far, and only 1 ad lib (10% CR). And out of 3264 rhesus monkeys looked at on record, only 2 monkeys had ever reached this age before. So that tells you something… maybe that ageing was indeed slowed. And we are still waiting for the final results from both studies which will be here in a few years time. And also, cancer incidence reported at the time was zero for the 30% CR group in the NIA study.

The researchers wrote about the monkey studies saying

“The possibility that lower levels of DR are as effective in increasing life span as high levels of DR could help explain the contradictory results reported on the effect of DR in rhesus monkeys in studies that were conducted at the University of Wisconsin and the NIA. One of the major differences in these two studies was body weight and the amount of food consumed by the AL monkeys. Body weight and food consumption were significantly greater in the AL monkeys in the study at Wisconsin compared to the AL monkeys at the NIA, suggesting that the AL monkeys at the NIA were slightly restricted compared to the AL monkeys at Wisconsin. Therefore, the lack of an increase in longevity reported by Mattison et al. could be because of the AL rhesus monkeys in this study having achieved a level of restriction necessary for an increase in life span, and a further restriction did not further increase lifespan.”

Study in Rats Comparing 10% CR and 40% CR

344 rat

In a study conducted in rats, the researchers looked to compare the difference in lifespan and disease in rats fed an ad-lib diet, 10% CR and 40% CR. What was interesting and what came to my attention before I had finished with the paper was that the mean lifespan was similar for both restricted groups, and that there was a significant increase in 10% survival and maximum lifespan for the 40% CR compared with the other two groups. This is similar to the trend that has been noted in the NIA rhesus monkey study. Because of genetic differences, monkeys may respond differently to varying levels of CR. You can see that quite a few rats in the study below died earlier than the 10% CR group, but the groups diverged near the end of the lifespan curve and the rats who ate 40% less lived far longer. Ad lib group max 1026 | 10% CR max 1180 | 40% CR max 1400.

So for a lucky few who do engage in more strict CR, the pay off might be significant. Although, on average, perhaps even a modest reduction in calories will increase your lifespan by quite a few years.  The rate of declining health for the ad lib and 10% CR group was similar, there was no real difference. However, only in the 40% restricted group was the slope of the gompertz curve altered, reflecting that the ageing of these animals was slower and they remained healthier and had a slower rate of decline in their health. The earlier deaths of some of the 40% CR group suggests that perhaps it was too much for some of the animals.

Calorie restriction in rats

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2015 Dec 22. doi: 10.1111/nyas.12982. Significant life extension by ten percent dietary restriction. Richardson, Austad, Ikeno, Unnikrishnan, McCarter RJ. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26695614

Humans who practice calorie restriction have greater control over the level of CR and can micro-manage their diet and supplements. We can also use tests to guide our practice and ease back when it might be too much. This gives us the best chance to see the best possible results from calorie restriction without compromising our health.

You can find the full paper here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nyas.12982/epdf

 

 

Looking Younger Than Your Age

Are you looking younger than your age?

I’ve always believed that there is benefits to be gained from starting an ‘anti-ageing’ diet or ‘programme’ from an early age. I wouldn’t recommend calorie restriction before age 20, but eating healthily from a young age is important. It never made sense to me to start eating healthily and looking after yourself when the damage has already accumulated, and is visible on the outside.

It’s often thought that the appearance reflects what is going on inside the body – so if someone looks quite healthy on the outside, there’s a good chance that the person is healthy on the inside as well. This of course may not always be true, but more often that not, it probably is a good indicator of health and perhaps even how long a person might have left.

In a recent study researchers took about 1000 people and looked at their biological age over a period of 12 years – starting from age 26 – and tracked changes in 18 biomarkers across chronological ages: 26 years, 32 years, and 38 years to determine the pace of ageing among the individuals. They looked at their metabolism, mental abilities, telomeres, and others biomarkers associated with organ function, and found that most people’s biological age matched closely with their chronological age, but a few aged more slowly (or not at all), while others aged much faster than normal.

As you can see, most people’s biological age closely matched their chronological age (38), but there were a few outliers.

biological age

Quantification of biological aging in young adults http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/07/01/1506264112

What’s more is that their internal health as measured by these tests reflected how old they looked on the outside. People who had younger biological health also appeared to look much younger than their age. And those who had worse results tended to look older than their chronological age. That in itself shouldn’t be much of a surprise, actually. But then again, seeing such dramatic differences even at a young age does show us that we need to take action early in life to have the biggest impact in staying young.

It’s assumed that we are optimized and functioning at peak performance in being able to deal with the day-to-day damage when we are young; and that good or bad lifestyle choices wouldn’t really affect the rate of ageing all that much, but this is wrong. Although the body can tolerate a lot at say, 25, it’s by no means immune from the damaging effects of bad lifestyle choices; whether it be junk food, smoking, too much alcohol, lack of sleep or whatever. The study also suggests that there might be room for improvement, and that we can make our cells and body more resistant to damage even in our 20s and see dramatic results if we maintain a good lifestyle.

As we get older, the risk of disease grows exponentially and we notice the effects of ageing come more rapidly, especially after the age of 60. It could be argued that the greatest impact from diet would only apply at middle age, but the study above refutes that idea. Anecdotally I can say that I know people who have looked after themselves when they were younger and are now benefiting from it. They look young and are generally much healthier than most people for their age. Starting a healthy lifestyle early in life means you get to enjoy more of your youthful period of life and also extend middle age period too.

Inspiration from people who are looking younger than their age

I know of two people who are really impressive when it comes to looking younger: Masako Mizutani who is now around 47 years old and looks in her late 20s to 30; and also my friend Paul who is 46.5 years old but still genuinely looks around 25 years old. It’s incredible… and hard to believe! But they look amazing. And I know that it’s not all about how young a person looks, but it does help, because it reinforces and validates the healthy choices you’ve been making.

Do you know anyone who looks very young for their age? And do you think your diet has slowed down ageing for you?

People age at wildly different rates, study finds (CBS MORNING SHOW)

 

Have you been on a healthy diet for a long time? if so, do people say you look younger than your age?

I’m really interested in hearing from people who’ve been eating either a raw food diet, on calorie restriction, or maybe just eating healthily for decades, and hearing if they get comments from people saying they look younger than their age. Sometimes it can be genetic, but I really believe that people who live healthy lifestyles can sometimes look decades younger, and it’s not always down to genes.

 

If you want to know what foods can improve your skin and slow the apperance of ageing, read How To Look Younger

Setting Goals

Always Set New Goals 

Not too long ago I was thinking that I hadn’t really challenged myself much lately or set goals for myself. Calorie Restriction can be a challenge at first, but eventually it does become routine for most of us. Some of us would spend a lot of time learning about nutrition by reading books and science articles to understand more about nutrition, health, and longevity. Although there’s a lot of new information come out all of the time about nutrition and the benefits of certain foods on disease and health, we learn learn plenty to be able to sustain ourselves on a calorie restriction diet and practice it safely. From that point we are essentially on autopilot. Many of us move onto other interests, while also maintaining this lifestyle.

Learning New Languages

So, back to what I was going to say: It’s normal that once we get comfortable with things how they are, we stay there and don’t take steps to move out of it. When we are children we have so much curiosity and are always exploring new things. Some people stay curiosity in life, while others stick to what they know and rarely venture outside of that for whatever reason. In life it’s important that we don’t get into a routine that makes us become stagnant and stops us from growing as a person. We should always explore new things, keep learning new skills, take up new hobbies, and meet new people. Ultimately it is up to us to make life the best it can be.

 

languages

 

I was introduced to K-pop last year by a friend and instantly loved it. At first it’s a bit ‘sensory-overload’ – but after a while you get used to it. Then I started to watch popular Korean Dramas and loved those too! They were different than the one’s I’ve watched in the UK or from the US. In my opinion, the dramas I’ve watched so far, including “Shine or Go Crazy and “My Love From The Star” are very good. My love from the Stars was streamed 14.5 billion times.

I think the Korean dramas have a more authentic style, better connections between the characters, beautiful fashion and costumes, and they are just wonderful to watch. What they sometimes lack with special effects, they more than make up with very good plots. They are funny, cute, interesting, and can be addicting!

After a while of learning more about Korea I’ve started to learn more about the history of Korea and their culture. It’s all been a fascinating experience so far. It’s almost like a new world opening up. And I guess that’s one of the best part about learning a new language.

Now that I’ve fallen in love with South Korea, I’ve begun learning the language because I would love to be able to communicate with the people when I eventually visit the country. (I will also visit Japan on the same trip). So I’ve set myself a goal to become quite fluent by next April, which I think is more than enough time given how much time I spent actively studying. For now I’ll study at home and look for South Korean stores and places here where I live so I can practice the language, as well as using Skype to talk to Korean friends of course. I’ve been researching a few Korean places local to me, and luckily there’s a few! Most South Koreans that come to the UK reside in London, though.

My Plan

When I get a good handle on Korean I will then start to introduce another language. Right now I still have a good grasp on Spanish, so I will listen, read, and try to speak more so I can improve to where I can converse easily. When I was studying it before I never really spoke much, and speaking is much more difficult compared to just being able to understand what is being said.  But for now my most active language will be Korean. At some point over the next few months I will also start to learn Japanese, too. But I won’t stop there! I intend to learn many languages… So far the one’s that I plan to learn are as follows:

Korean

Japanese

Spanish

Chinese (Mandarin)

Why Learn All of These Languages? 

Firstly, why not? Once you’ve learned them you can enjoy all that these countries have to offer. By learning these languages I will be able to speak to people from these countries and create new opportunities. Here where I live we’ve also had so many university students from China in recent years, too! And language learning also helps you think differently. It improves your memory and keeps the brain young!

As I was trying to look for tips on learning new languages, I came across a guy who speaks 50 languages – not all fluently, but many of them he is exceptionally good at. He also has a love for Asian languages and culture. You can see him converse in them in the video below.

My experience in learning Korean has been great so far. I love every minute of it. It doesn’t even feel like I am studying because I enjoy it so much. And that’s the way language learning should be! 🙂 It feels amazing to just be able to understand suddenly a few verses in a song that you couldn’t a few weeks ago. Over time things that were just “noise” become clearer. It’s these little achievements that make me excited! But the real benefit for me would be able to speak to people in their native languages. This is my goal, and I will achieve it!

Okay, that’s all for now. There’s lots more to update you on with regards to new goals of mine, but I wanted to stay on the topic of language. 🙂